• TCM/Qi Gong Guidance (includes meditation and yoga)
  • Breathing Techniques
  • Meditation Guidance
  • Aromatherapy
  • Acupressure
  • Acupuncture (Future)
  • Energy Healing (Future)
  • Teas/Herbal therapies (Future)
  • Rowing Meditation (Future)

TCM/Qi Gong Guidance (includes meditation & yoga)

Traditional Chinese Medicine or TCM, as it is commonly referred to, is one of the oldest systems of healing. It is said to have originated sometime in 1766 BC during the Shang dynasty when the first healers documented their work. The system of healing is over 3500 years older than traditional western medicine. Take, for instance, the formation of the American Medical Association in 1847. However, the most common mistake people make is associating traditional Chinese medicine with what’s called “oriental medicine,” which is a catch-all phrase used to describe mainly practices that weren’t only developed in Asia but across the world.

Traditional Chinese Medicine happens to be a standardized version of Chinese medicine that has been practiced since prior to the Chinese revolution. It is mainly rooted in ancient beliefs. One of the most important ones even in this day and age is that of the Daoist belief system that the human body is a smaller version of the universe. There is the belief that vital energy, aka Qi (pronounced “chi”), as it’s called, flows through the entire body and is responsible for multiple functions needed to maintain good health. All Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioners believe that chronic pain is mainly caused by a blockage of the Qi or an imbalance, and as doctors, they need to correct the flow of balance, whichever may be the case.

Traditional Chinese Medicine or TCM, as it is commonly referred to, is one of the oldest systems of healing. It is said to have originated sometime in 1766 BC during the Shang dynasty when the first healers documented their work. The system of healing is over 3500 years older than traditional western medicine. Take, for instance, the formation of the American Medical Association in 1847. However, the most common mistake people make is associating traditional Chinese medicine with what’s called “oriental medicine,” which is a catch-all phrase used to describe mainly practices that weren’t only developed in Asia but across the world.

Traditional Chinese Medicine happens to be a standardized version of Chinese medicine that has been practiced since prior to the Chinese revolution. It is mainly rooted in ancient beliefs. One of the most important ones even in this day and age is that of the Daoist belief system that the human body is a smaller version of the universe. There is the belief that vital energy, aka Qi (pronounced “chi”), as it’s called, flows through the entire body and is responsible for multiple functions needed to maintain good health. All Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioners believe that chronic pain is mainly caused by a blockage of the Qi or an imbalance, and as doctors, they need to correct the flow of balance, whichever may be the case.

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Breathing Techniques

Integrative Medicine, or IM as it is often referred to, is a combination of conventional medicine, and complementary treatments. The goal for Integrative Medicine is to treat the individual as a whole and not just a particular health problem.

Many forms of mind-body therapy are mainly meant to help activate your parasympathetic nervous system, settle the mind and consequently reduce stress. This will decrease pain sensations, increase your immune function and increase the release of endorphins to help with mental acuity and mood. The most commonly prescribed therapies include breathing techniques, and meditation.

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Meditation Guidance

Do you hold stress in your body? Perhaps in your neck or pelvic/hip muscles? Meditation has been shown to help relax muscles and decrease pain perception by up to 25%. It can help to decrease your need for medication or at least optimize the way the medication works. For chronic pain, guided meditations seem to be most effective, but everyone is different and can change over time.

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Self-visualization (you are the guide)

  • Review each of your 5 senses one at a time to observe what you are seeing, hearing, smelling, etc. without judgement, excuse, or qualification.
  • Review how you are feeling. This can be a review of each part of your physical body, your emotional state or mental focus or all three. Go slowly one at a time, again without judgement, excuse, or qualification.
  • Visualize light or heat moving from one part of your body to another and as the light or heat passes through an area, the area warms and relaxes.
  • Repeat a soothing phrase, a core value or a dedication for your day, syncing it up with your breathing.
  • Take deep breaths focusing on your breath by counting your inhales and exhales to make them deep and even.
Yoga Guidance

Do you hold stress in your body? Perhaps in your neck or pelvic/hip muscles? Meditation has been shown to help relax muscles and decrease pain perception by up to 25%. It can help to decrease your need for medication or at least optimize the way the medication works. For chronic pain, guided meditations seem to be most effective, but everyone is different and can change over time. Try some of the tips below to see what works for you.

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Aromatherapy

Description coming soon

Acupressure

Description coming soon